REFLECTION 22: FEEDER PATHWAYS

Welcome fellow friends! To end off Glycolysis we will be briefly discussing the feeder pathways. This topic is least important for our course but we should still briefly know something about it, so I posted this blog to help those struggling to get the gist of this topic.

Feeder Pathways for Glycolysis

In glycolysis most carbohydrates except glucose are transformed into one of the glycolytic intermediates. Listed below are the most significant:

1.      The storage polysaccharides glycogen and starch

2.      The disaccharides maltose, lactose, trehalose and sucrose

3.      The monosaccharides fructose, mannose and galactose

Metabolism of Glucose

There are two routes in which fructose can be metabolized:

1.      In adipose tissue

2.      In the liver

Let’s see how in each case.

In adipose tissue: Fructose is phosphorylated to Fructose-6-phosphate that enters into glycolysis by muscle and kidney enzyme Hexokinase

In the liver: Fructose is metabolized by the Fructose-1-phosphate pathway by the enzyme Glucokinase.

Metabolism of Galactose

Galactose enters glycolysis via the galactose-glucose interconversion pathway which is a 4 step reaction sequence. See image below of this pathway.

1856_Metabolism of fructose1

Galactosemia is a genetic disease caused by the inability of the body to convert galactose to glucose this causes the buildup of galactitol which can have severe consequences to the individual.

Well guys, that ends glycolysis I hope you guys enjoyed and learnt something from the posts, activities and videos. Thanks again!

 

References:

Featured Image: http://voh.chem.ucla.edu/vohtar/winter06/classes/153C/pdf/LectureSet_1_CHO.htm#slide0012.htm

Image: http://www.expertsmind.com/topic/glycolysis/metabolism-of-galactose-95879.aspx

Youtube: BiochemJM

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s